Home Forums Mini-Lessons 08-24-2011 – Good Life #7 [ANSWERED]

This topic contains 5 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  trunklayer 7 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #16233

    koichi
    Member

    So, we know he says he remembers the day he was born. But… do you believe him?

    そんなの覚えてるわけがないって?

    1. What is the grammar point わけ do/mean?

    2. What is the って at the end?

    3. What does そんなの覚えてるわけがないって? mean?

    This one might take a little more research on your part, but research is good… will help ingrain a lot of this into your head, which is the point! If you put some work into it, you’ll get some learnin’ out of it.

    Covering Spoilers…
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    Spoilers Covered

    • This topic was modified 12 years, 10 months ago by  koichi.
    • This topic was modified 12 years, 10 months ago by  koichi.
    #16240

    Elenkis
    Member

    1. This is probably a bad explanation, but わけ shows that something is a conclusion that came from logical reasoning. When followed by がない is means that there’s no reason, or no way for that thing to have happened or to be true (the speaker thinks it’s impossible).

    2. って is the casual quoting particle (と) and often leaves off the ending if it’s implied (for example: heard, said, thought).

    3. I’m not quite sure what って is replacing in this sentence, but I’m going to guess at something like:

    “I thought there was no way you could remember such things (your own birth)?” or “I heard there was no way you could remember such things?”

    #16382

    Drayomi
    Member

    “わけ” means “reason” or conclusion” and can be used to say something like: “心無くしたわけじゃない…” “It is not the case that I lost my heart…” or “It is not that I lost my heart…”. Though according to Denshi Jisho, “わけがない” means “there is no way”. Though I would literally translate it as “reason/conclusion exists not.”.

    “って” is the casual quoting particle. It is a shortened version of “というのは”. But it also can be a substitute for the “は” particle.

    So, そんなの覚えてるわけがないって? can be translated as: “Did you say that there is no way he could remember something like that?” or “There is no way he could remember something like that?”

    Edit: Though Elenkis makes a good point. It could also be translated as: “I thought there was no way that you could remember something like that?”

    • This reply was modified 12 years, 10 months ago by  Drayomi. Reason: Due to Elenkis' response
    #16401

    jkl
    Member

    > って?

    Eijiro has lots of examples of this usage, and it looks like it indexes the question mark symbol, so you get good results.

    http://eow.alc.co.jp/%E3%81%A3%E3%81%A6%EF%BC%9F/UTF-8/

    It appears the usage is a sort of rhetorical question. I would make the sentence something like, “Is it really possible to remember such things?”

    #16405

    koichi
    Member

    そんなの覚えてるわけがないって?

    1. What is the grammar point わけ do/mean?

    indicates the speaker’s conclusion that he/she came to via deductive reasoning.

    2. What is the って at the end?

    Used to “Quote” what’s being said. In this case, he’s “quoting” you saying “there’s no way you remember that” – This grammar point is casual.

    3. What does そんなの覚えてるわけがないって? mean?

    ” ‘There’s no way I’d remember that,’ you say? “

    #49802

    trunklayer
    Member

    1. Well there are several words that read わけ, but I think that in this context it means 訳. In turn, this わけ has several meanings, out of which I’d choose “situation”. As in “You think that the situation, in which it’s possible to remember such things doesn’t exist?”
    2. Well, from what I’ve found out, I’d say that in this context it’s used to indicate a rhetorical question.
    3. I’d translate this sentence as “You think it’s impossible to remember such things?”
    [update]
    1. I failed this one.
    2. Also failed, but maybe not too much…
    3. And again I’ve failed. I think I did manage to roughly get the intended meaning though.

    • This reply was modified 7 years, 7 months ago by  trunklayer.
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