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  • in reply to: Progress thread #50089

    trunklayer
    Member

    Btw, another good tool for NHK
    javascript:(function(){var newcss="ruby rt{ display:none; } ruby:hover rt{ display:block; }";if("\v"=="v"){document.createStyleSheet().cssText=newcss}else{var tag=document.createElement("style");tag.type="text/css";document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(tag);tag[(typeof document.body.style.WebkitAppearance=="string")?"innerText":"innerHTML"]=newcss}})();
    After adding it as bookmark, one can simply click on that bookmark from the article’s page and it would off the furigana which makes reading far more interesting.
    Also, here is the way to download the audio from there:
    http://www.tomsguide.com/answers/id-2913569/download-audio-file-nhk-news-web-easy.html

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: Help with corrections! #50075

    trunklayer
    Member

    I can’t seem to find the worksheet in question – what lesson are you up to, specifically?

    It’s Season 5, Lesson 6, page 7

    (For one thing, trunky, みる is group 2 – group 3 consists of just する and くる. Koichi’s description of “group 2 verbs that look like they should be group 1″ makes it SEEM like they’re group 3s, but they’re still all group 2s. Honestly, though, I’ve never been a fan of calling them “group 1″ and “group 2″, because I can never remember which group is which – I learnt them as う-verbs and る-verbs. In Japanese, they’re called 五段 (ごだん) and 一段 (いちだん), for etymological reasons that I don’t precisely recall, but personally I remember because ごだん verbs form the ~た form five different ways, while いちだん verbs only form it one way. But I digress.)

    Huge thanks! This has always been a source of a lot of confusion for me, as the jisho.org uses the Japanese names for the groups and TextFugu uses the TextFugu’s names…

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: Help with corrections! #50069

    trunklayer
    Member

    Well, I’ll try my best to help; sorry, I’m still only beginner myself, so maybe it would be wiser to wait for Joel先輩, but I guess it wouldn’t hurt if I try to help in the meantime.
    If I’m not mistaken, the rule is this: ため after the present tense verb is the “purpose” ため and ため after past tense verb is the “because” ため。 Knowing this, let’s look at the sentences:
    1.「にほんご を べんきょうした ために 。。。」 - the verb 勉強する (べんきょうする) is in the past tense, so this part translates as “Because I’ve studied Japanese…”
    Your answer is 「アニメをみった」. Well, first, I’m afraid, there is a mistake here: the verb 見る (みる) is a group 3 verb (even though it looks like a group 1 verb), so the casual past tense would be not みった, but みた。
    「にほんご を べんきょうした ために アニメ を みた」 - “Because I’ve studied Japanese, I watched anime”.
    Well, seems ok to me. I would have said 「日本語 を 勉強した ために アニメ を 見ること が できます」 (にほんご を べんきょうした ために アニメ を みる こと が できます) – “Because I’ve studied Japanese, I’m able to watch anime”, but it contains some season 6 grammar that you haven’t learned yet (assuming you are at the end of the season 5 from which comes this spreadsheet). So, your response seems ok to me, apart from mistaking みる for a group 1 verb.

    2. 「TextFugu を かった ために」 - as in the previous sentence, the verb 買う (かう) is in the past tense, so we are dealing with the “because” ため again and the first part translates as “Because I’ve bought the TextFugu…”.
    Your answer is 「べんきょうしに行った」 – “I went to study”, so the full sentence is “Because I’ve bought the TextFugu, I went to study”. Seems fine to me.

    3. 「とうきょう に いった ために」 and again the verb 行く (いく) is in the past tense, so – again “because” ため and the first part sentence translates as “Because I’ve gone to Tokyo…”
    Your answer is 「きっぷを買いに行った」 - “I went to buy a ticket”. Hm… If it had been the “purpose” ために (in which case the first part would have been 「東京 に 行く ため に」 (とうきょう に いく ため に)), you answer would have made perfect sense – “To go to Tokyo, I went to buy the ticket”. But as it’s the “because” ために… Well, the situation when you have to go buy a ticket, because you’ve been to Tokyo, is not impossible, so I guess your answer is ok, as long as you understand that this is the “because” ために and not the “purpose” ために

    4. 「ビール を のんだ ために」 And again the verb 飲む (のむ) is in the past tense, so – the “because” ため.
    “Because I drank beer…”
    Your answer is “I didn’t get on the car” (or it might be the train, ship, plane – depends on the context). Seems fine to me, although I would have used 運転しませんでした (うんてんしませんでした) - “I didn’t drive”. But your answer seems ok too.

    5. 「ビデオ を つくった ために」 Heh, it seems all these five sentences use the “because” ため
    Even here, in this last sentence the verb 作る (つくる) is in the past tense…
    “Because the video was made…”
    Your answer “I didn’t see it”. Hm… Sounds a bit strange to me.

    Sorry again for not being able to be of more help – it hasn’t been a long time since I’ve finished TextFugu myself, so I’m not much better than you. Still, I hope you find this at least a bit useful.
    Anyway, once Joel先輩 gets back he will make everything clear.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: Progress thread #50050

    trunklayer
    Member

    I gave it a try – and it turned out to be great! Thanks again!

    in reply to: Progress thread #50047

    trunklayer
    Member

    This sounds great, thanks a lot!

    in reply to: Progress thread #50039

    trunklayer
    Member

    Started reading NHK easy news on a daily basis. Some of them I can read without using a dictionary, others – I have to look up most of the words, but the important thing is that I’m finally able to use a “Japanese only” site, even if it’s one of the simplest ones.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: So Are These Useful Or No? [ASK THE COMMUNITY] #50029

    trunklayer
    Member

    Hm… well, I think about a week should be more than enough; than again it’s entirely up to you to decide.
    I hope more people join us, because it’s really fun and useful.

    in reply to: So Are These Useful Or No? [ASK THE COMMUNITY] #50017

    trunklayer
    Member

    Very interesting lesson, Thanks a lot!
    Sorry for not having done it sooner – there was an urgent job to be done, so for the last two months I was a bit overloaded; even my WaniKani reviews got a bit piled up, which never happened before.
    Nevertheless, if I’d seen that lesson, I would have done it, but I kept forgetting to visit TextFugu, sorry about that. Oh well, the good thing is, that urgent job is finally over, so now I can put more efforts into studying again.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: 2016-12-01 Cheers #50016

    trunklayer
    Member

    1. I’d translate it as “Australia-USA relationship”.
    2. I’d say it’s a noun.
    3. Nominalization.
    4. I’d say it’s an adverb.
    5. I’d say it allows to determind the second noun (親密 – friendship) with the first one (強固 – strong).
    6. I think that, despite being in newspaper, it’s still a casual language, becouse 「述べた」 is used, instead of 述べました at the end of the first sentence。I’d speak like this with people I know well, people who are equal in rank or lower than me.
    7. Here is my translation:
    Prime minister Turnbull described the relationship between Australia and USA as “Strong friendship”.
    When prime minister Malcolm Turnbull found out that Donald Trump has won the presidential election in USA, he (Turnbull) appeared on the ABC channel’s “730″ tv-show at the 9th of November and stated that the relationship between Australia and America are continuously “strong friendship”.

    in reply to: Modifying a noun phrase #49836

    trunklayer
    Member

    Heh, I guess it can’t be helped then…
    Anyway, as always, thanks for the help!

    in reply to: 09-06-2011 – Fun With Particles #1 [ANSWERED] #49818

    trunklayer
    Member

    1.a. I’d translate it as “This is a monkey of mister M”. Unless, of course, this is a talking monkey – in that case “I’m a monkey of mister M”.
    2.a. “This is Mr. Tanaka from Sony”.
    2.b. Someone else is saying this, because honorifics are omitted when talking about yourself.
    3.a. “I’ve bought an interesting one”.
    4.a. “I’ve used the one I’ve bought”.
    4.b. It must have been said earlier in the conversation.
    5.a. “I want the one that belongs to Mr. Missing…”
    5.b. It replaces the noun that is already known to all the participants of the conversation.
    6.a. “Learning kanji is difficult”.
    7.a. “I saw Mr. Winter eating sushi”.
    7.b. It’s a nominalization の. It turns verbs into nouns.
    8.a. “Why are you eating?”.
    8.b. I’d say there is a good chance that the speaker is a girl/woman, because の is a feminine sentence ender.
    8.c. It indicates the question.
    Update
    Checked with the correct answers – well, I’d say all my answers are within the acceptable range.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by  trunklayer.

    trunklayer
    Member

    Hm… I’d answer like this:
    1. He added 「今」、replaced 「住んでます」 with 「生んでいるのです」、replaced 「オレンジ」 with 「オレンジ色の」 and used 「どうしたら+verb」 pattern instead of 「verb+方法はありますか」 pattern.
    2. The first one was when he said that some Japanese people might forget what “desperate” means, so it’s better to use 「困ってるんだ」 instead.
    The second one was when he pointed out that you accidentally wrote 「以上」 instead of 「以下」。
    3. You desperately wanted to buy that T-shirt, but it turned to be a limited edition that you can only buy at that location. And your anonymous friend wasn’t in Japan at that time, neither is he into girls’ T-shirts.
    4. I’d translate 「うーんと、よく覚えてないけど、カナダに来る前には5000円以下、つまり65ドル以下だったと思う」 as “Yeah, although I don’t remember it well, I think that before I came to Canada it’s cost was less than 5000 yen, in other words, less than 65$”.
    5. Well, the first main point I’ve already pointed out when answering question 3.
    The second is that although that person refused to help you buying the T-shirt, he advised you not to give up and look it up on auctions.
    The third main point is that he agreed to help you buying the AKB game for PSP once he returns to Japan.
    6. Well, I might have missed something, but it seems I’ve already met all the grammar points used in this lesson before (whether I manage to learn them correctly is a different story though).
    7. Lol

    in reply to: 08-30-2011 JIN #2 #49813

    trunklayer
    Member

    1. I’d translate it as “satisfactory” or “proper”.
    2. I’d translate it as “tools and medicine”
    3. I’d translate the whole sentence as “No proper tools, no proper medicine…”
    By the way, if my translation is correct that would confirm the time travel assumption, because Edo definitely must have had the best tools and medicine in all Japan at that time, so only someone who came from the future could have said such a thing.
    [update]
    The feeling when you go looking for correct answers and realize they were forgotten to be added… Well, no matter how I look at my answers, they seem more or less correct…

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: 08-29-2011 – JIN #1 [ANSWERED] #49811

    trunklayer
    Member

    1. I’d translate it as “Although it’s probably unbelievable” or “Believe it or not”
    2. It means Edo – the old name of Tokyo.
    3. Well, as far, as I know, that period was characterized by strict social orders (isn’t what I’d call “cool”), isolationist foreign policies (doesn’t seem that cool either), and an increase in both environmental protection (this, on the over hand, is cool) and the creation and popular enjoyment of arts and culture (definitely cool).
    4. I’d translate it as “Currently, I’m in Edo”.
    5. I’d translate the whole sentence as “Although it’s probably unbelievable, I’m currently in Edo”.
    Well, it’s a wild guess, but I’d say he might have traveled back in time somehow.
    [update]
    Well, it seems I’ve managed to answer everything close enough.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: 08-26-2011 – Good Life #9 [ANSWERED] #49809

    trunklayer
    Member

    1. I think in this context it means “because”, on pair with 「から」 in the end.
    2. I’d translate it as “Because at that time my father…”
    3. I’d translate it as “Because was crying”.
    4. I’d translate the whole sentence as “Because at that time… my father was crying”.
    5. I think, those were happy tears for having such a son.
    [update]
    Seems I’ve managed to answer questions 1-4 more or less correctly.
    As for fifth question – it’s a matter of opinion, although seeing the drama might clarify things.
    Actually, this drama seems to be quite worth watching.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by  trunklayer.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 37 total)