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  • in reply to: 08-25-2011 – Good Life #8 [ANSWERED] #49804

    trunklayer
    Member

    1. I think it means 嘘 – “lie”.
    2. As I’ve learned in Season 3 Lesson 9, よ is a sentence ender indicating Assertion. So, I’d translated this part as “That’s not a lie!” or “I’m not lying!”.
    3. As far as I know, it means “truly”, “really”.
    4. From what I could find out, I’d say it indicates a confident conclusion.
    5. I’d translate it “That’s not a lie! (I’m not lying!) I really do remember it!”
    [Update]
    Well, this time all my answers seem to have landed in the correct range.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: 08-24-2011 – Good Life #7 [ANSWERED] #49802

    trunklayer
    Member

    1. Well there are several words that read わけ, but I think that in this context it means 訳. In turn, this わけ has several meanings, out of which I’d choose “situation”. As in “You think that the situation, in which it’s possible to remember such things doesn’t exist?”
    2. Well, from what I’ve found out, I’d say that in this context it’s used to indicate a rhetorical question.
    3. I’d translate this sentence as “You think it’s impossible to remember such things?”
    [update]
    1. I failed this one.
    2. Also failed, but maybe not too much…
    3. And again I’ve failed. I think I did manage to roughly get the intended meaning though.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: 08-23-2011 – Good Life #6 [ANSWERED] #49800

    trunklayer
    Member

    Ok, so first answers – then check.
    1. As far as I know, it means “insufficient”.
    2. Well, “insufficient child” doesn’t sound right… I’d translate it as “Not good enough child”
    3. I’d translate it as “Although I’m not a good enough child for you”
    4. As far, as I know, it means roughly the same thing as 「よろしくお願いします」 which I would translate as “nice to meet you”.
    It’s used during introductions. For example: 「はじめまして。トランクレーヤーです。どうぞよろしく」。
    5. I’d translated the whole sentence as “I’m not a good enough child for you, but nice to meet you”.
    [update]
    1. Well, I’d say 50/50. As I’ve said in the answer to the second question, I used this word in a very broad sense.
    2. Well, not exactly, but close. By child I meant the son.
    3. Hm… I’ve seen どうぞよろしく being used in the same situations as よろしくお願いします、and their broad meanings seem close enouth to how I translated it. The introduction starts with 「はじめまして」 and ends with either of these two. If we don’t take the meaning literally – then I’d say my translation is not that far off. I’d say, 50/50.
    4. Just like with previous question, I’d say 50/50.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: 08-22-2011 – Good Life #5 [ANSWERED] #49797

    trunklayer
    Member

    Ok, as always: first – answers, then – check:
    1. I’d translated it as “that’s why”.
    2. I think it means “I shaked hands with my father”.
    3. If I’m not mistaken, it means “Nice to meet you”. It’s used when introducing yourself.
    4. I’d translate the whole sentence as “That’s why I shaked hands with my father. Nice to meet you, father”.
    [update]
    1. Failed, but not too much, I think.
    2. Close enough, I think.
    3. Seems fine.
    4. Well, all in all, I’d say close enough.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: So Are These Useful Or No? [ASK THE COMMUNITY] #49796

    trunklayer
    Member

    In the absence of Koichi, you maybe want me to try giving it a shot? =)

    That would be great!

    in reply to: So Are These Useful Or No? [ASK THE COMMUNITY] #49790

    trunklayer
    Member

    1. I find them very useful.
    2. Yes I do.
    3. The ones I’ve read so far are quite balanced.
    4. Well, it’s been quite a while since they’ve stopped… I understand that コウイチ先生 is an extremely busy person, and he’s been doing these mini lessons for free… So, I’m in no position to ask for any more of them, but if there were more – at least a lesson once a few months, or even once a year – I think that would be great.
    5. Well, I can’t say I have any preferences regarding the content… I like the idea of using the content from sources like drama (like it’s done in the “Good Life” mini-lessons), anime and books though.
    6. No, I post my answers right after reading the questions. After that I go to check the correct answers and then modify my post. If the lessons were ongoing then I would post my answers and then read the answers of the others while waiting for the correct answers then I would finally compare my answers to the correct ones.
    7. Well, as I’ve already said when answering question 4, I think it would be very helpful if these lessons started again, even a lesson once a year would be good enough.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: 08-19-2011 – Good Life #4 [ANSWERED] #49788

    trunklayer
    Member

    Ok, first my answers – then the check.
    1. I’d say it means “such time”.
    2. I’d translate it as “New leather shoes get wet”.
    3. I’d translate it as “Was worrying about”.
    4. I’d say, in this context it means “At”.
    5. In nominalises it and makes it the object for the following transitive verb.
    6. I’d translate the whole sentence as “At such time, my father was worrying about getting his new leather shoes wet.”
    Time to check the answers.
    1. Close enough, I think.
    2. Excactly right.
    3. Close enough, I think.
    4. This one I have failed. I should have checked my guess about the meaning of “なのに” at jisho.org. The reason is that I thought of it as a combination of particles な+の+に rather than a dictionary word.
    5. Seems close enough.
    6. I’d say, 50/50. I failed to include the meaning “And yet even” (due to having answered question 4 incorrectly), but other than that I’d say I translated it close enough. Heh, I was on the verge of writing “And yet even” in the beginning, because the context really screams for it…

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: 08-18-2011 – Good Life #3 [ANSWERED] #49780

    trunklayer
    Member

    Ok, first I’m going to answer myself then check it and update the post.
    1. I think it was clear weather that day. Very clear weather in fact.
    2. 良い means “good”, so 良く means “well”.
    3. I’d say it means “clear day”. 晴れる means “to clear up”, so the “day that was cleared up” would be “clear day”.
    4. I’d say it means “very clear day”. “The day that was well cleared up”. As with the forth question of the previous lesson, I’d say that without the contest both present and past tense translations are possible, but as we are talking in the context of “Good life”, this should be past tense.
    So, I’d translate it as “It was a very clear day”.

    Time to compare my answers with the correct ones.
    [update]Well, I’d say the difference between my answers and the correct ones is within the acceptable limits.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: Question about mini-lesson two. #49779

    trunklayer
    Member

    As expected, you were right!
    Heh, it turns out, コウイチ先生 answered this question in the next lesson when he explained why he had translated 「よく晴れた日」 in the past tense:

    You might also notice that the sentence is past tense (“was a really clear day”) even though there’s nothing saying it’s past tense (the only bit of past tense going on was 晴れた日, but that only has to do with the day’s status).

    But, we know the day in question was in the past, just because of the previous conversations (where he said he remembered the day he was born… which is obviously in the past) so even though he’s omitting the だった or でした at the end we know it’s a past tense sentence.

    Sorry, if I saw it yesteday, I wouldn’t have bothered you with this question, but I didn’t want to go to the next lesson before I understand the previous…

    Anyway, thanks for the help!

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: Question about mini-lesson two. #49777

    trunklayer
    Member

    So in other words, did I understand you correctly that both
    とても空気が澄んだ三月の朝です。(The sky has cleared in the past and it’s morning in the March now)
    and
    とても空気が澄んだ三月の朝でした。(It was a clear morning in the March)
    are correct?
    And that without ending, the sentence 「とても空気が澄んだ三月の朝」 can be interpreted as either present or past depending on the context?

    in reply to: Question about mini-lesson two. #49773

    trunklayer
    Member

    澄んだ is past tense. =)

    Yes, but it I thought this past tense was about the sky clearing, not about the whole sentence. I mean, can’t I say とても空気が澄んだ三月の朝です – “It’s very clear March morning” (The sky has cleared previously, but the morning is now)? Or would that be incorrect?

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: 08-17-2011 – Good Life #2 [ANSWERED] #49765

    trunklayer
    Member

    Ok, first I’ll give my answers then look at the correct answers and update my post.
    1. I think it means “very”.
    2. 空気 I know from WaniKani – it’s “atmosphere”; 澄む I’ll learn at level 45, so I had to look it up at jisho.org; it’s “to clear”. 空気が澄んだ – “Atmosphere has cleared” – I’d translate it as “clear-skied” (not sure there is such an adjective in English, though), “bright”.
    3. I’d translate this whole sentence as “Very bright March morning”.
    4. I think it’s です/だ at the end of the sentence.
    update
    1. Got that one correctly.
    2. I think I got it close enough.
    3. As for using “bright” instead of “clear” – I think it’s close enough. But it seems, I confused the tenses. As the end of the phrase was omitted, I assumed it’s in present tense, yet the official translation is in the past tense. I’m going to look this thread more carefully and if I can’t find anything – ask a question.
    4. Got that one correctly.
    second update
    It seems I’m not the only one who thinks that this sentence could be translated in present tense as well as in past tense. I’ll need to ask this question.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: Two questions about passive form #49743

    trunklayer
    Member

    Thanks again for the help!

    in reply to: 08-16-2011 → Good Life #1 [ANSWERED] #49740

    trunklayer
    Member

    Ok, I’m going to first post the answers I came up with myself and then look at the correct answers and compare them.
    1. I’d say, there is a good chance that the person in question is a man, because he is using 僕 to refer to himself
    2. I think that the second 僕 is actually part of 「僕が生まれった日」.
    3. I’d translate 「生まれた日」 as “day when was born”. If this translation is correct then 「僕が生まれった日」 should mean “The day when I was born”.
    4. I’d translate the whole sentence as “I’m thinking of the day when I was born.” While the first meaning of 「覚える」 is “to memorize”, “I’m memorizing of the day when I was born.” wouldn’t make much sense, neither would “I’m picking up the day when I was born.”, nor “I’m feeling the day when I was born.”, so that leaves us with “I’m thinking of the day when I was born.”
    Time to check the answers!
    [update]
    Well, my first answer seems close enough to me. More so for the second and the third ones.
    The fourth answer… All right, here is where I’ve failed. I’ve totally forgot that 「覚える」 can also mean “to remember”… Oh well, now I’ve memorized this meaning and will remember it.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
    in reply to: Progress thread #49734

    trunklayer
    Member

    I decided to keep posting my progress here, because this is where everything really started for me.
    TextFugu might not be my first Japanese textbook, but it’s the first Japanese textbook I was able to understand, so any progress I’ll ever make in learning Japanese would be mainly thanks to TextFugu.
    By the way, speaking of my first textbook – I’ve started re-reading it. It’s full of linguistical terms, but now that I have the idea about their meanings, they don’t look that scary anymore. Heh, it looks like by “Predicative adjectives” they actually meant い-adjectives.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by  trunklayer.
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 37 total)