Home Forums The Japanese Language JLPT winter 2013

This topic contains 54 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  vanandrew 10 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 46 through 55 (of 55 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #42833

    Aikibujin
    Member

    How much benefit do you guys think there would be in taking one episode of a show, at a high beginner level, and watching it over and over and over, looking up everything until you could understand everything in that one show without subtitles?

    #42835

    That radio show sounds like a great resource especially when it has a script. It’s about finding something that interest you and you’ll want to do in your spare time. In that way it ends up not being a chore but a leisure. I found a playlist of all the previous episodes for youhere. If you can’t find something on youtube it’s probably on youku(needs a Chinese VPN for certain shows) or ニコニコ.

    If you want to start adding words to an anki deck I suggest using tagaini jisho to check for JLPT level. If it is N2 or below it is probably worth learning. This is only a general rule though. If there are words you see over and over you should always add them. Often they will be more common than the actual JLPT words. For example 清楚 is not part of a JLPT but is much more common than 葉書.
    To check how common words are you can also search google for it (put “” around the word). If you get below 100k results it might not be worth adding.
    I don’t suggest using jisho for determining if a word is common or not. That function seems to be flawed. You can always try to search for example sentences on there though. If there are 0 examples sentences for a word it is probably isn’t very common.
    Personally I use a combination of all three to determine how common a word is. I do however only use google when I am in doubt if it is a word I want to add or not. I’ve made a script(there are a lot of parameters specific to my PC) that automatically looks up a word in 5 different dictionaries to make this process easier. Just press alt+f paste the word in the search field and then 1 second later I can check the Japanese definition, English definition, JLPT level and example sentences :P It also automatically copies what I have marked to a specific field of anki with hotkeys. I’ve added almost 1000 words to my own anki decks so you can almost guess that it is something I’d recommend to everyone.

    I agree with you that lyrics have strange word choices at times, so it’s probably not the best source of words. But who cares? It just has to be something that interests you. This is what you do in your spare time so being effective isn’t really the main issue. Studying being fun is. Just use the sources I listed above and I am sure you can pick words from lyrics that are common and you’d want to learn. The radio show would probably also be great for this. Especially because it has a transcript.

    Facebook is fine ;)

    As for your question Aiki, I think it doesn’t make much sense as a beginner. Once you get to a higher level sub2srs can be an awesome way to make loads of very good anki cards in a very short time. Currently I’m busy watching “my boss my hero” and will probably end up making at least one episode in to anki cards. I will no doubt suspend some cards since studying every sentence of a drama doesn’t make much sense to me.

    #42837

    @Aikibujin: Do you not think watching the same episode over and over would get boring after a while? I couldn’t even do that with shows *in English* that I know I really like :P

    @Mark: Thanks for that link, that’s awesome! I would have had a better look for something like that myself but I’ve been so busy with uni work recently (stayed up all last night through to today getting a project done for; it’s 9pm now so I’m pretty exhausted haha).

    That’s a cool method for scoping out words. What language is that script in? I’m a computer science major but I’ve no idea how to even run it o_o That project I was working on was an Android App in Java; I have a bit more experience with that than scripting languages (though not much).

    Also, I added you on Facebook. Found you through a friend of a friend, my friend being Kaona and her friend being missingno15 ;)

    #42839

    Cimmik
    Member

    @Mark: Thanks for that link, that’s awesome! I would have had a better look for something like that myself but I’ve been so busy with uni work recently (stayed up all last night through to today getting a project done for; it’s 9pm now so I’m pretty exhausted haha).

    The file format is ahk. It’s used in a program called AutoHotkey which makes it possible for you to easily make your own hotkeys.

    #42840

    Cimmik
    Member

    @マーク・ウェーバー
    Btw, I can’t really make you script work for me (I use google chrome), and it’s probably not only the browser that make problems. I’ve only known of AHK for one day now so (as you can guess) I’m pretty much noob in using it.

    #42842

    Aikibujin
    Member

    Yes it would be boring, but so is Anki in general a lot of times.

    So I figured if it would help a lot, I could just suck it up and do it. But if not…

    #42843

    Yeah it’s an auto hotkey script(doesn’t get much simpler which is why I can use it). It can be run directly from a .txt document and is a very easy way to automate task on your computer. It is pretty simple and is mainly used to simulate key strokes, mouse moves, clicks etc.. But also has a lot of other functions.

    This script will be hard to customize for other computers since many parameters are awfully specific. For example the coordinates of mouse clicks will be different if you have another resolution than me, and I use 16:10 which isn’t very common. It also requires you to use firefox – some hotkeys I used in the script won’t work in other browsers. And on top of that you’d also need to customize your anki/script so everything matches.
    I added a lot of error messages though so finding out where things go wrong should be fairly easy.

    I am not going to explain the script, but below is the hotkeys used to run it. You can look up all the commands I used on autohotkey.com

    The hotkeys are:
    alt+s starts everything necessary to run the script. Firefox if not already opened, tabs in the correct orber and tagaini jisho.
    alt+f opens an inputbox to look up a word

    The following three hotkeys copy what is marked to a specific field of anki and returns the mouse the the position it was at when it copied.
    alt+z top field(kanji)
    alt+x middle top(hiragana
    alt+c middle bottom(example sentence)
    alt+v bottom(meaning)

    #42844

    ¬_¬ It even says “Syntax: Autohotkey” right at the top; how did I miss that?

    #42857

    Cimmik
    Member

    For example the coordinates of mouse clicks will be different if you have another resolution than me, and I use 16:10 which isn’t very common.

    Should the mouse position make any difference in looking up the words or add them to anki?

    #42895

    vanandrew
    Member

    A few weeks late, but it was hard! Listening was the hardest, as I expected.
    The reading comprehension section was hard in just the amount of time it took to read (such child like reading speed!). I felt fairly pleased with how I went in that section, considering.
    It did feel rushed at times, I did expect a little more time per question – but then again, I’m not advanced.

    Overall, glad I did it, was worth it. I liked having something to work toward.

Viewing 10 posts - 46 through 55 (of 55 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.